Birds - An Introduction

Due to me having so many bird motifs to show, these are placed into categories for a better presentation. Ideally, these would be consistent, but due to the nature of the studies, this ideal is not always realisable. Here I have different types, with some finished, some semi-neat. Some are of geometric lines, some of curved. Some are of a single tile. Some are essentially one-offs. Some are of a specific colouration, namely black and white. A brief description follows:
 
Birds 1 consist of 'finished' birds, of a geometric nature concerning their outline, of one motif, all based upon an underlying square

Birds 2 consist of 'finished' birds, of a geometric nature concerning their outline, of one motif, all based upon an subdividing square
 
Birds 3 consist of bird motifs that have inherently real-life appearance, with subtle, curving outlines, in effect echoing the outline of the real-life bird. As a consequence of this subtle, curved nature, these will be found to be more inherently life-like than with the preceding more 'severe' geometric outlines of Birds 1 and 2. However, this is not to say that these are any 'better' than those types, as they are of different types, as one is not comparing like for like.
 
Birds 4 consist of tessellations in which the outline consists of both geometric and curved lines, in the form of arcs.
 
Birds 5 in contrast to the preceding groupings which concerned themselves with tilings of a variety of tiles within a theme, here concerns itself with more specific matters, namely tessellations based upon a single tile, namely with a Greek cross (of which 'subdivided' examples is also included). Although very 'simple' in its outline, the Greek cross is still eminently suitable for a bird motif, as shown, albeit not one of the highest quality in an aesthetic sense – for example, the birds bill lacks "definition", as it has to be "assimilated" due to the tiles outline – contrast this with other examples, say, Birds 1. Even so, accepting the limitations of the outline, the bird motif is still pleasing and worthy of inclusion.
 
Birds 6 is essentially a miscellaneous collection of bird motifs of a semi-neat nature that are on occasions related, of which this aspect is duly noted as appropriate as below. These can be regarded as the 'final study' before a definitive example is undertaken, and so are thus of interest in their own right.

Birds 7 consist of 'semi-neat birds of a similar theme, these having all arisen out of one of my design methods. In contrast to the other bird sections, the method is discussed (albeit briefly), from which from apparent simplicity this thus demonstrates how more complex combinations of motifs can thus ensue. These are then followed by some arbitrary examples, of a semi-neat nature that are a direct outcome of the process.
 
Birds 8 are essentially a miscellaneous gathering of various examples, all of a finished type, that do not readily fit into the categories of the other seven groupings. Frequently, but not necessarily, these are more complex in their nature.

Birds 9 consists of motifs as according to colour, more specifically of black and white, rather than type. This is thus somewhat of an arbitrary category, of which arguably the motifs would be better placed under their respective types. However, as black and white colouring is so striking, these are thus grouped together.