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Hi, I’m David Bailey from Grimsby, England, with a keen interest in recreational mathematics, of a mostly geometrical nature, and more specifically of Escher-like tessellations along with their application to polyhedra. Additionally, I make the occasional foray into 'pure' tiling, such as pentagon tilings, and historical matters too, such as with the well-known 'Cairo tiling', 'cluster puzzles', 'houndstooth' tessellation and various Escher research. This website is thus dedicated to showing my own efforts in this field, along with some other aspects pertaining to the subject, such as various essays on tessellation, where I set my thoughts out, and are designed to be a tutorial in form.

The tessellations shown are most of what I term as of final, 'finished' examples, designed, drawn and coloured (generally of watercolour) by hand, and not a computer. These are essentially the product of a systematic study, which frequently belies various complexities that of necessity require a thorough approach. Also included are some that are best described as 'studies', of which, for various reasons, I have simply not found the time to complete as finished examples. These are thus simply denoted as ‘study’. Generally, but not always, the 'finished' and 'study' tessellations are accompanied by some explanatory text, whereby the various ‘intricacies’ behind the tessellation are discussed. In addition, each drawings colouration is discussed. The tessellations are so placed into distinct groupings as according to their motif, i.e. of birds, fishes ... as appropriate, with any further subdivision, due to there being so many examples of a specific motif (primarily of the bird examples) are thus put into arbitrary subcategories for the sake of general order.

Correspondence is welcomed: davidbailey500@googlemail.com

All images and text copyright David Bailey 11 September 2009



Requests
1. Does anyone have access to JSTOR, Project Muse, Shibboleth and OpenAccess log-ins and passwords? These are needed in conjunction with my studies.
2. Christie's Amsterdam auction house in 2012 held a sale of Escher and Gerd Arntz correspondence. Does anyone know who now holds this collection?
3. Is anyone planning a visit to Stanford University? There is much in the Martin Gardner archive that I would like to see.
4. Does anyone have any Escheriana for sale, or of interest? Obviously, I am interested in such matters. 

New
Latest additions/revisions first. A complete list is on the 'update history' page. Minor updates are ignored:



2018
5 January. My Library, annual update, now split into three sections; books, articles and 'all else'

3 January. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Escher-like jigsaw puzzle of fish, by Angie Leslie, US


2017

19 December. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Origami, by David Mitchell, of UK

13 December. Cluster Puzzles - Elspeth Eagle-Clarke biography substantially rewritten
6 December. 
Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous -  Origami, by John Szinger, of US

30 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Shelving unit, by Alexander Pincus, of US

23 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Board game, 'Cairo Corridor' by Markus Hagenauer, of Germany

21 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - 'Pentagonal Framework', by Adriel Designs, of US

16 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Acoustic Walls, by Kamilla Lang Hermansen, of  Norway

15 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Wall installation, at the Arndale Shopping Centre, of ManchesterUK.
14 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Coffee table by 
Francesco Caracciolo di Marano and Sam Robin, with their company Robicara, of US 

13 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Exhibition stand by Institute for Lightweight Structures and Conceptual Design (ILEK), of StuttgartGermany

10 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Flooring and Wall, First Base Pizzeria, of Cape Town, South Africa

3 November. Cairo Tiling, Miscellaneous - Monzer Hammoud, 'Pont des Arts' coffee table text and pictures added

2 November. Where Is... Josephine Mold added




Creating the website has been a labour of love, not a profit-making exercise. I do it because I can, and because of the people who tell me how much they value it. Even so, I still have to pay the various costs. Some kind readers have asked if they can show appreciation with actual money. So I’m trying 
this, if anyone cares to donate a small sum, of just a few pounds/dollars:







Since 16 January 2017



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